Athletes’ foot is among the most common fungal infections with which people contend. Although some of us are more prone to this condition than others, many people engage in everyday behaviors that are highly conducive to its formation.

So, if you’ve frequently found yourself locked in battle with an athlete’s foot, you may need to amend certain habits.

Frequent athlete’s foot sufferers looking to bid a not-so-fond farewell to this bothersome condition should be mindful of the following behaviors.

Battling Athlete’s Foot

1. You’re Cohabitating with Someone with Untreated Athlete’s Foot

An athlete’s foot is contagious, so if you constantly find yourself beset by foot-based fungal infections, it’s possible that someone with whom you share a residence has an untreated case of athlete’s foot.

If this is indeed the case, you should be particularly mindful of any areas where this individual has been barefoot. You’ll need to be especially wary of showers, bathmats, and bathrooms in general.

Should you discover that someone with whom you cohabitate is suffering from an untreated athlete’s foot, take care to give them a nudge in the right direction. More often than not, an athlete’s foot can be successfully treated in a timely and cost-effective manner.

However, since this is not an affliction that will go away on its own, allowing it to go untreated is likely to make the problem worse and increase its chances of spreading to others.

Additionally, if you or your partner are suffering from an athlete’s foot, abstain from sleeping barefoot. If your feet are touching feet infected by athlete’s foot throughout the night, your chances of contracting it are fairly high. You should also consider investing in bedsheets that are designed with cutting-edge antimicrobial technology.   

2. You’re Sharing Footwear with Others

Sharing footwear is never a good idea, especially if one of the parties involved is infected with an athlete’s foot. So, even if you’ve regularly shared footwear with friends and family members in the past without any unfavorable results, your luck is bound to run out at some point.

Abstaining from sharing shoes and socks – especially unwashed shoes and socks – with others will significantly lessen your chances of contracting and spreading an athlete’s foot.   

Sharing Footwear

3. You Aren’t Changing Footwear Often Enough

Sweat buildup is highly conducive to the formation of an athlete’s foot, as well as a variety of other fungal infections. And since foot-based sweat tends to build up in shoes and socks, changing your footwear on a consistent basis can be a boon to your athlete’s foot avoidance efforts.

So, rather than have a single pair of shoes that you wear every day, purchase several pairs that you alternate. This will help ensure that each pair has ample time to air out before being worn again. It’s also recommended that you change your socks multiple times throughout the day – i.e., before going to bed, after waking up, and after engaging in strenuous exercise.

Additionally, regardless of how cumbersome you find doing laundry, you should never wear a pair of socks for multiple days. While you may regard this as a practical time, it’s extremely unhygienic and highly likely to result in the formation of foot fungus.  

4. You Haven’t Properly Treated an Existing Athlete’s Foot Infection

As stated above, an athlete’s foot isn’t going to go away on its own. Furthermore, the longer you allow an athlete’s foot to go untreated, the more likely it is to spread and the more severe the infection is likely to become. So, if you develop an athlete’s foot, it’s imperative that you begin treatment posthaste.

Fortunately, there’s no shortage of easy – and affordable – ways to treat athlete’s foot. Virtually any pharmacy you walk into is likely to have an abundance of creams, sprays, powders, and other medications designed to stamp out foot fungus. Should over-the-counter treatments prove unsuccessful at ridding you of an athlete’s foot, get in touch with a good dermatologist?

No one relishes dealing with an athlete’s foot. Even if it’s considered a low-level fungal infection, it’s still itchy, uncomfortable, and unpleasant to look at.

Furthermore, since an athlete’s foot is contagious, it stands to impact the people around you, as well.

So, if you’re tired of regularly contending with such a cumbersome affliction, there’s no time like the present to send athlete’s foot packing – and there’s no better way to do this than correcting the behaviors outlined above.

Athlete’s Foot Infection

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